According to GoBankingRates, the average cost of a wedding in 2020 was $19,000. That’s not pocket change. And the reason for the high price tag? The majority of the money goes to the reception venue. The runners-up are the DJ and photographer. You’ll also need to pay for a florist, food for your guests, a wedding dress, invitations, etc.

If you’ve been dreaming about the perfect wedding for years but you don’t think your budget will cover it, don’t fret. You can still have the wedding of your dreams without having to make compromises. Starting a side gig could help you bring in the money you need to pay for everything. Naif Productions presents some tips to help you earn a little extra money to help pay for your upcoming wedding.

Sell crafts on Etsy

If you’re a crafty person, you can make extra money by selling your pieces on Etsy. There’s a place for everyone, whether you’re skilled at making organic self-care products, designing clothing, or crafting handmade jewelry. Becoming well-known on Etsy will take some work. You’ll need to pick the perfect name for your store, customize your profile, and market yourself on social media. But you can build up a customer base by providing unique, quality items. Keep in mind that there are fees for selling on Etsy. According to Penny Hoarder, you’ll need to pay a 20 cent listing fee, a 5% transaction fee, and if you want to get the most out of Etsy, a $10 subscription fee to Etsy Plus.

Sell things you don’t need

If crafting isn’t your thing, you can find potential inventory in the back of your closet or in a box in your garage. If you have any clothing that’s in good condition that you don’t wear anymore, you can make your money back through sites like Ebay, Depop, ThredUp, or Poshmark. To sell your clothing or items for the most money, make sure you take showstopping photos. Use a neutral background and good lighting. The best way to make sure you have the right lighting is to always take photos during the day. Avoid using flashes, as this will add a glare to your product and might even change what the color looks like in the photo.

Become a freelancer

If you have graphic design skills or you’re a natural wordsmith, you can make some money putting your skills to use through freelance sites. The first step to starting your freelancing side gig is choosing a niche where you can offer your expertise, but be sure to make your niche as specific as possible. For example, instead of presenting yourself as a blogger, maybe present yourself as a self-help blogger. Much like anything else, you’ll need to market yourself to be successful. Building up a client base also takes time. To make money as a freelancer, you might even have to do cold pitches.

Petsit

Pet sitting can be a fun side gig if you are an animal lover. A lot of people go on vacation and have to leave Fido at home. This is where you come in. Whether the pet parents decide to have you take him home with you or house sit while they are away, you’ll get paid to take care of someone’s pet while they’re away. This doesn’t just apply to dogs. If you have the skills, you can take care of other pets like cats, turtles or rabbits. Again, you’ll need to build up a good customer base and have several references to succeed at this gig. According to Rover, you could make up to $1,000 per month pet sitting.

Start your own business

If your side gig becomes a full-fledged business, and you’re ready to establish yourself with the state, there are a few steps involved. First, you’ll need to confirm that the name you plan to use isn’t already taken. Next, you’ll need to go through the motions required to register your business with the state. When considering business structures, the best option is a Limited Liability Company. This will protect you from any liabilities, and your personal finances will be considered separate from your business finances. If you plan to operate under a name that’s different from the one on your official paperwork, you’ll need to register your DBA (doing business as) name as well. Fortunately, companies like Zenbusiness can help you through the registration process, saving you time and money.

Once you have the paperwork completed, you can start working on things like your website and logo — both of which you can do yourself online. There are many website builders available, and using a free online logo maker will allow you to create an eye-catching image that will represent your business whenever you share information online or in print.

It will take some time to start bringing in profits. But if you work hard, you might just end up with a permanent side gig to cushion your income. Once you’ve found a gig that works for you, it’s time to start socking away money for the big day!

If you want someone to help take the hassle out of planning a wedding yourself, get in touch with Naif Productions, New York City’s best event and wedding planner. Email us at events@naifproductions.com.

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This article was written by Gloria Martinez.

WE’D LOVE FOR YOU TO SHARE THIS IN YOUR NEWSLETTER OR WEBSITE BUT PLEASE INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING COMPLETE INFORMATION: Event Producer Strategist, Entrepreneur, Speaker, and Coach, Annette Naif, CEO & Creative Director of Naif Productions

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About Naif Productions:

Naif Productions is a strategic event planning, design and production firm specializing in corporate, live coaching sales events, social, non-profit, and weddings. Based in New York City, we produce events worldwide from Fortune 500 clients and coaches to families and charities. Naif Productions specializes in helping clients attain their goals, realize return on investment, and achieve the most unique, creative experiences.

About Annette Naif:

Since 1986 Annette Naif has been designing and producing custom events, helping clients create their unique style that translates into a memorable and profitable experience. Annette spent 17 years producing events in the motion picture industry where she helped coordinate numerous productions for film and episodic television programs. Since then Annette’s been running her own event production company, coaching other event planners, teaching an event operations and production course at NYU, and now is the CEO & Creative Director of Naif Productions.

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